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MAKRAN
THE GREAT MALAN, OFF MAKRAN, 1863
Engraving from a drawing by C.H.Crowe, published in The Illustrated London News, 19 September
1863.

The Great Malan mountain - over 3200 feet high overlooking the southern Makran coast and about 100 miles east of Karachi - proved to be a formidable obstacle to the working party throwing the telegraph wires.
The antiquity of the area, and because of its ready access to the Arabian sea, caused a natural association to be made with other classical sea-faring nations, such as the Greeks. 'Many places of the Lus and Mekran coast are the same as those given by the Greeks, and mentioned by Arrian. Maluna, Araba, Kalama .. are now called Mallan, Araba, Kalamat', (Ross (1883) 62).

The Great Malan of Makran, 1863
WORKING PARTY, AGRORE, MAKRAN, 1863
Engraving from a drawing by C.H.Crowe and published in The Illustrated London News, 19 September
1863.

Agrore was a flat plain, three miles from the river Huddee and overshadowed by the 1000-feet high Hinglaj peak of the Hala mountains, about 150 miles from Karachi.
This engraving, The Illust rated London News wrote informing its readers depicts 'the flying or advanced camp of the No. 1 working party of the Makran telegraph department at Agrore, on the line to England, via the Persian Gulf and Bagdad in Asia Minor. In the foreground the Pathan or Afghan coolies are engaged in their war dance.'

Working Party ar Agrore, Makran, 1863
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