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LAHORE
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The Gulabi Bagh gateway, built at Begumpura in 1655 by Mirza Sultan Beg, led into one of the major gardens which dotted the environs of Lahore.
In this illustration, the gateway has been embellished fancifully with columns borrowed it would appear from the Chaburji gateway. The gateway, as the signboard states, was used as a police station.
Gulabi Bagh gateway, Begumpura, Lahore, 1873
The formal Mughal gardens of Shalimar were laid out for Shah Jahan in 1642 by Khaliullah Khan. The garden had three levels - the lowest providing access
to the gardens, the second higher level known as the faiz baksh or bountiful, and the highest where the royal apartments were being the farah baksh or pleasure-yielding.

Shalimar Gardens. Lahore 1880
BRIDGE OF BOATS ACROSS THE RAVI,
LAHORE, 1849

Engraving published in The Illustrated London News,
27 January 1849.

The building on the right, incorrectly identified as the summer-house of Maharaja Ranjit Singh on the banks of the river Ravi, was most probably the riverside gateway leading to the mausoleum of Jahangir on the western Shahdara bank of the river.

Bridge boats across the Ravi, Lahore, 1849

THE MAUSOLEUM OF THE EMPEROR JAHANGIR, SHAHDARA, 1878
Miniature painting in gouache by Lassaju, dated A.H.1296 (1878-79 A.D.). Inscribed: naqsha maqbara jahangir badshah waqiah sawad lahore ma'aruf shahdarah - matabiq photograph - 'plan of the tomb of the emperor Jahangir at Lahore and Shahdara'.

The mausoleum of the emjeror Jahangir who died in 1627 was commissioned by his son and successor Shah Jahan. It took ten years and cost about ten lakhs to complete. This miniature by a local artist was derived, as its inscription states, from a contemporary photograph.

THE MAUSOLEUM OF THE EMPEROR JAHANGIR, SHAHDARA, 1878
171. THE CENOTAPH OF EMPEROR JAHANGIR,
1864
Water-colour by W. Simpson, 1864.


William Simpson visited Lahore in the spring of 1860, travelling with the camp of the Governor-General Lord Charles Canning and his artist wife Charlotte. Simpson's technique was to make quick deft sketches in situ, which he later developed into fuller water-colours. This particular picture had been part of an ambitious series he had intended to complete on India for publication as lithographs, comparable to David Robert's spectacular prints on the Holy Land and Egypt. The scheme foundered because of the insolvency of his publishers Day and Son Ltd. and eventually when a book of Simpson's Indian work was brought out in 1867 under the title India Ancient and Modern, it contained far less than the two hundred and fifty Simpson had originally planned.
The marble cenotaph, inlaid with semi-precious
stones, depicted by Simpson in his sketch stood as was the convention in Mughal tombs above the actual grave of the king.

The Cenotaph of Emperor Jahangir, 1864
HIRAN MINAR, SHEJKHUPURA,1878
Miniature painting in gouache by Lassaju, a local artist, dated Samvat 1936 (1878 A.D.).

Located about 21 miles from Lahore on the western Shahdara side of the Ravi river, the Hiran Minar monument at Sheikhupura was built by Jahangir to commemorate a favourite deer. In those days the area was a royal hunting preserve and abounded with wild game.
The layout consisted of a central three storeyed pavilion set in the centre of a large artificial lake with an elevated access from two sides. If this representation is accurate, then one of the approaches has since been dismantled. The minaret on the left was over 100 feet high.

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Hiran Minar, Sheikhopura, 1878
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